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Available from Time Released Sound.... timereleasedsound.com/releases/richard-moult-david-colohan/

I have copies of the special edition remaining. Mail me at endofnavigation@gmail.com for details.

'Hexameron is a delicate work. Well-thought out and executed everything falls into the right place. Every piece feels spacious. Aspects of the sound seem to transmit from far-away places. Guitars glisten. Piano is particularly effective throughout the six piece merging effortlessly with the more rock elements. Stranger still are the wordless vocals that add the right amount of emphasis when necessary. The entire mix comes together to create these shaky structures that manage to stand up quite well as a whole. Less of a series of songs it is more a continuation of a theme that works throughout each song, building upon the last.

On the opener the wordless vocals have a near-religious quality to them. Following the opener is an even quieter piece that barely raises its volume above a whisper. Around the third track the guitar begins to get a little prickly allowing for a compelling amount of drama. The fourth and fifth tracks go hand in hand. Deep heavy bass permeates most of the fourth track which gives off the impression of a brooding piece. Violence reigns on the fifth track which is by far the most aggressive piece on the entire collection, starting from the sad and building up to a fury by the end. For the finale things end off on a quiet meditative mood with the wordless Gregorian-like chorus.

Richard Moult and David Colohan go for restraint on ‘Hexameron’ and the payoff is wonderful. Moments of it absolutely shine with hope.' Beach Sloth

Hexameron is a delicate work. Well-thought out and executed everything falls into the right place. Every piece feels spacious. Aspects of the sound seem to transmit from far-away places. Guitars glisten. Piano is particularly effective throughout the six piece merging effortlessly with the more rock elements. Stranger still are the wordless vocals that add the right amount of emphasis when necessary. The entire mix comes together to create these shaky structures that manage to stand up quite well as a whole. Less of a series of songs it is more a continuation of a theme that works throughout each song, building upon the last.

On the opener the wordless vocals have a near-religious quality to them. Following the opener is an even quieter piece that barely raises its volume above a whisper. Around the third track the guitar begins to get a little prickly allowing for a compelling amount of drama. The fourth and fifth tracks go hand in hand. Deep heavy bass permeates most of the fourth track which gives off the impression of a brooding piece. Violence reigns on the fifth track which is by far the most aggressive piece on the entire collection, starting from the sad and building up to a fury by the end. For the finale things end off on a quiet meditative mood with the wordless Gregorian-like chorus.

Richard Moult and David Colohan go for restraint on ‘Hexameron’ and the payoff is wonderful. Moments of it absolutely shine with hope. Beachspot

Like clockwork (get it? sorry...) comes another gorgeous release from local label Time Released Sound, and another disc of pastoral ambient minimalism, but unlike many of the other TRS releases, which fuse electronic and organic sounds into lush and lovely blissed out driftscapes, Richard Moult and David Colohan conjure up something much more 'classical' sounding, merging a modern classical minimalism, with the hushed brooding post rockiness of groups like Godspeed, albeit with out the slow builds and bombastic crescendos. Although these two do have some sonic tricks up their sleeves, but more on that later. For the most part Hexameron is a stately, melancholic arrangement of mostly piano, with spidery minor key guitars, the sound fleshed out with subtle percussive flourishes, swirling strings, choir like voices, the sound sweeping and cinematic, but also hushed and intimate. Fans of James Blackshaw, Lubomyr Melnyk, Anton Batagov and the like will be in heaven.
The opener is dusky and balladic, pointillist piano stretched out over a rich, lustrous low end thrum, soft streaks of subtle guitar strums drift through the shadows, a definite Bark Psychosis vibe for sure, the second track is more of the same, but the duo employ some barely noticeable studio trickery to add some subtle psychedelia to the proceedings, the guitar swooping to the fore, unfurling emotive peals of aching guitar melody, all drifting over a lush bed of softly churning thrum. As the record progresses, the sounds seem to grow less distinct, the background sounds blurrier and more washed out, notes on the piano bathed in reverb, sounding almost dubby, arcs of gently distorted guitars, often coming together into soft focus squalls of dreamnoisedrift, other times, the piano struggles to stay above the surface, as the various ambient sounds grow crunchy, and buzzy and staticky, the final track adding more distorted guitar buzz, a little fragmented glitchery, and some echo drenched skronk, over the otherwise tranquil and somber pianoscape below.
As always, the packaging is stellar, and delivered in two versions, the standard, limited to 200 copies, which houses the disc in a nicely printed full color gatefold, and the deluxe, limited to just 75 copies, which pulls out all the stops, the packaging made from pages out of a 90+ year old book, wrapped in a collaged, inked and stamped envelope, itself also housed in a hand worked outer translucent envelope. Also included are medieval drawings, a banded cd sleeve made from a page of heraldic crests, and a large double sided insert!! Aquarius Records


Timelines can give us a lot of historical information in an easily accessible way, but they’re just static, stationary bars. In a classroom, 10,000 BC may be a turn of the head, or the click of a mouse, away from 500 BC, but in reality the distance is of course massive and immeasurable. For many of us, the classroom can now be added to the timeline in being a thing of the past. Music, though, continues to teach us lessons, perhaps even more so during adulthood. Timelines are all well and good, but music drops the listener instantly into any period, no matter the century.
Timelines are useful in that they highlight crucial periods in history, but that’s where the line ends. History can’t be viewed in a straight, serene line. The gaps, placed between the timeline’s white lines, tell of steady upheaval and brutal repression, disguised by leaders as peacekeeping when in actual fact it was mere abuse of power and retribution. There’s so much more going on underneath the surface; there’s a complicated amount of activity which must be deciphered. In turn, this process itself would take thousands of years to fathom, let alone unwind.
Likewise, music measures its movement by way of airborne vibrations, but it never moves in a straight line. She curves, swerves, sways and skips her way through the air. The notes are not used as a reference, but they help to define the sentence and the outcome of the phrase. And like dates in history, they link up to one another, hopping from decade to decade and changing the course of history as they do so. In the scheme of things, Hexameron is a fair distance away, tapping into the ancient rural recesses left behind by the Roman Empire and the first, harsh stirrings of medieval machinery. The word Hexameron literally means ‘six day’ in Greek (hence the six compositions here), a theological commentary that describes God’s work on the six days of creation, usually taken out of Genesis 1.
The music, then, is ancient. It birthed itself at a time when our new year of 2014 was but a speck on the horizon. In fact, Hexameron could be a recently unearthed remnant left over from the ancient world, dug up by musicians Richard Moult and David Colohan, both members of the experimental-folk collective United Bible Studies. In a place of peace and serenity, clean tones chant honestly and the open expanse rolls into view. Ancient warriors lurk behind their vantage point, ready to strike at any moment.
Arrows of distortion leave wounds on the skin of the cleanly strummed guitar. The chords lack resolution, so the anticipated battle is left suspended, left to wait. Sparsely strummed guitars are left to ring on and on, and over the foothills the piano walks, wandering through the ancient land. Deep caves hide the lower tones, covered in mud and sediment as if after heavy rain. Their music sprawls itself over the chasm of time, over the centuries, spanning the time between this very day and the time of yesterday gone. United Bible Studies have a passion for mythology, and the music rears its vicious head as if it were a minotaur.
Despite the seismic gap lying between the centuries, the music isn’t age-old and tattered, but it does sometimes bend to the plague of distortion, which cuts through the music with its abrasive blade of ruin. The duo take us to ‘the remote places of pagan pilgrimages, early Christian Hermitages…into the religious wilds of a Europa long gone’. The notes that ring out are on a melodic pilgrimage, slowly shuffling closer and closer to their destination. The adventure is exciting, with continents yet to be discovered.
As the ancient tones trickle out of the music, so too do they bleed onto the quaint landscape; a land where the threat of jagged cliffs and stormy weather makes the journey treacherous, but a land where dim lights frequently shine through the music, calling the notes home and helping them through the fire. It’s a small comfort, but one that is needed when you’re far away from home.
Music is the oldest language, predating the timeline itself. It was there when the Earth was an infant, her music thrashing in the roaring wind and rushing through the volcanic plasma. Music isn’t created by man – we’re just the vessel, and the instruments are the temporary body. She will never need to contemplate extinction, no matter the century. - James Catchpole, Fluid Radio.

Each sound on Hexameron is like a cliff edge, leaving ever step of my journey in transitory uncertainty and suspension. Moments are held open in the weightless expectation that the future will come to catch them – pianos hang with held breaths, with open chords beckoning the response that will endorse its next step forth, while gleaming guitars span out like a path into fog, setting out a journey of intuition and instinct rather than with the explicit prize of destination in mind. The album is a state of wandering, embracing transit as its own sort of stasis; a waltz with landscape, acquainting itself with every soft tuft and fractured edge of its surroundings to find peace in the constant unraveling of heritage and sensory detail.

I am brought to mental images of contemplative pastoral plains – rolling, uninhabited hills, with choir voices gathering like vapour in the conjoining valleys. The erosion of time haunts every instrument here, with a coarse static coat alluding to the history to which every fractional detail of its placement and texture is in debt; even though there’s an improvisational quality to the distorted guitar leads that rip open the music’s midriff, and to the piano melodies that trace the constant arpeggiating gradients of the landscape itself, there is also a strong presence of pre-destiny, as though Hexameron is gliding gracefully down the spiritually assured channel of fate. The moments of climax feel like the points at which vague sensation comes into meaning; where belief thickens into certainty, turning every searching step into an enlightened onward motion. ATTN:Magazine

The latest release from the splendid Time Released Sound label features two students from Ireland’s premier wyrd folkers United Bible Studies who are also musical luminaries in their own right; Richard Moult (of Far Black Furlong, Orchestra Noir and composer of many fine recordings under his own name) and David Colohan (of Raising Holy Sparks and Agitated Radio Pilot). Hexameron is a beautiful and melancholic journey recorded by Moult in the early hours of darkness during gale force winds at his home on the Isle of Skye and later added to and embellished by Colohan in Ireland. Much like the circumstances of its recording, Hexameron is a dark, spacious twilight of an album with moments of quiet reflection occasionally punctuated by sudden and heart wrenching gales of noise.
Each piece is accorded a number rather than title, suggesting that the album is to be taken as a movement or as a set piece that builds and grows. Emerging from the twinkling, peaceful acoustic dusk of the first piece, Moult’s piano merges with Colohan’s distorted electric guitar on track two, elegantly evoking slivers of sadness and longing in a haze of fuzz and tremulous reverbed notes. The third piece is built upon Colohans’ acoustic fingerpicking, the sense of beauty and gentleness added to by Moult’s piano until huge sudden swathes of electric noise come crashing through like wind against the landscape to be joined by haunting keyboards before fading back to piano notes; the swell of the storm subsiding. Moults’ most recent album Aonaran (also featuring Colohan and highly recommended) evoked a sense of the Western Isles and the mountainous, wild terrain that Moult was writing in. Colohan’s Raising Holy Sparks also do a good line in painting a vivid picture of wide open horizons and desolate yet beautiful vistas; both artists do not disappoint with this joint outing. You can almost taste the darkness over the hills and water; the sense of quiet and loneliness inherent in these songs. Yet there is an extra element include this time around; a sense of the time of year (January) and small hours that Moult initially recorded in. This music exists at the liminal margins of both night and day, when one is fading into the other; the night sky is lightening yet is still dark. It is this texture and quality that affords such a melancholy and wonder to these tracks. Colohan’s guitar virtually yearns over Moult’s Popol Vuh-eque keyboards, the piano glistening like dawn over the water. Occasional discordant blasts of alto saxophone and trombone add to that 3am sense of disorientation.Track five adds tense John Cale style bass notes to the building and gathering maelstrom of guitar and piano, not unlike Nico’s classic ‘Evening of Light’ (itself reminiscent of a winter storm). Final piece, number six, appears to herald in the dawn, broken yet triumphant guitar proclaiming survival over echoing keyboards and piano.
The nearest comparison to this album is the artists’ own individual previous work and collaborations but at a push there are elements of Godspeed You Black Emperor’s most widescreen and atmospheric adventures as well as perhaps ‘Music for Films’-era Eno and again, Popol Vuh. However the music that these two criminally under sung artists make is truly theirs; it is in a world of its own.
Special mention must be made of the beautiful packaging that this album comes housed in; Time Released Sound are known for their releases being works of art in themselves (witness Plinth’s ‘Collected Machine Music’ which came as a music box with its very own individual song strip and covered in vintage photographs and ephemera). A surrealist collage made from original work by Gustave Dore and added to by Colin Herrick of the label it features waves, angels, woodland and machinery adorning the cover, suggesting an uneasy mix of nature, spirituality and the industrial world. Indeed this album is spiritual; it evokes a sense of human frailty and search for meaning, and who hasn’t been in that space at 3am at some point? This standard edition is limited to only 200 copies; do not miss out.
The deluxe limited version package, in an edition of just 75 copies, is composed of original pages from a 90+ year old book on the work of the obscure 15th century printer and illustrator Anton Sorg. The collaged, inked and stamped envelope comes in a hand worked, outer translucent envelope with a selection of his medieval drawings, a banded CD sleeve made from a page of heraldic crests and a large double sided insert.
This is music for those dark, empty times of night when all you can hear is the wind and your own thoughts. A soundtrack to the storm. Grey Malkin, The Active Listener

Entrambi accomunati dall’esplorazione degli aspetti più misteriosi della tradizione rurale britannica, Richard Moult e David Colohan tornano a collaborare per un progetto artistico parallelo alla loro esperienza in seno al collettivo United Bible Studies.

Le sei tracce raccolte in “Hexameron” uniscono le partiture al pianoforte di Moult alle ambientazioni bucoliche di Colohan, trasformandole entrambe nel senso del depotenziamento delle orchestrazioni abitualmente più articolate del primo e della modulazione dei paesaggi sonori del secondo in senso ora incantato ora tenebroso. Entrambi i percorsi sono coerenti con la miscela di sacralità e paganesimo che costituisce la traccia concettuale del lavoro, elaborata attraverso una compunta impostazione cameristica nella quale Colohan amplifica attraverso rapite rarefazioni e saltuarie torsioni di visionaria psichedelia oscura.

Echi corali di una ritualità ancestrale si affacciano lungo le sei tracce del lavoro, incentrato nella sua interezza su atmosfere di una magia inquieta, che nei quattro brani più concisi digrada in placide contemplazioni costellate da lente armonie pianistiche e oblique folate d’archi, mentre in particolare nelle due composizioni che oltrepassano i nove minuti di durata si sviluppa in pronunciati apici di iterazioni elettriche percorse da acida inquietudine.
Sono queste le due facce dell’espressione dei due artisti inglesi, la cui sensibilità li rende al tempo stesso artefici di un delicato paesaggismo sonoro quanto ieratici dispensatori di incantesimi che possono sfociare in dolci sogni come in visioni inquiete.

È proprio l’ambivalenza del mistero sotteso ai culti religiosi, catturato da Moult e Colohan in una sequenza di lieder medievali declinati secondo moderne successioni tra neoclassicismo e psych-folk, a rendere “Hexameron” un’opera preziosa, tra le più compiute ed evocative realizzate nei rispettivi percorsi e nell’ampio novero di tutta la temperie impegnata nella riscoperta degli aspetti più arcani della tradizione britannica, sotterraneamente attiva negli ultimi anni. Music Won't Save You

As usual with Time Released Sound you get two versions of this. A digipack retailing at under a tenner and a limited edition at over £30. At just 75 copies and composed of original pages from a 100 year old book on the work of the obscure 15th century printer and illustrator, Anton Sorg its probably pretentious enough to provoke interest to justify such a price tag.

The music is pleasant interplay between treated piano, affected guitar and what the sleeve advises is alto sax but I’ve not heard any yet (thankfully). ‘Recorded in gale force winds’ it says, and there’s something as lonely and lonesome of being trapped in a lighthouse on a stormy night about the compositions. They ebb and flow like the tide battering away on the sea walls at Seahouses.

Its reminding us of the Harold Budd and Brian Eno album ‘Ambient 2; The Plateaux of Mirror’, a constant roll of piano with improvised guitar providing deeply atmospheric music that has a dark edge to it. That alto sax I mentioned earlier has just appeared and its as discordant as ever so I’m off for a lie down. Norman Records

'This can be marked as ambient and meditative, but an ever-present
piano also makes a classical touch on it and at the same time it is
played enough freely to get the attention of those who are into
experimental stuff. It is a collaboration between piano/keyboard
player Richard Moult and multiinstrumentalist David Colohan; both of
them are also members of United Bible Studies, an avant-folk
collective from Ireland. Six instrumental tracks create a consistent
stream of sound, filled with harmonies as a basis for contemplation or
daydreaming. Besides dominant piano, an electric guitar adds a
progressive rock atmosphere, and some chords even evoke the crushing
heaviness of doom (by the end of the first minute of track 3). Alto
saxophone is rarely heard, but it does a properly strange jazz effect
(as it is around the eighth minute of the 4th track).
The album was published by Time Released Sound, a label focused on
“classically infused and folk based ambient and electroacoustic
sounds”. The standard digipak version in front of us has a cover
collage that contains Gustave Doré’s artwork in contrast with some
industrial visual elements (spur wheel and various parts of some
mechanism).' Black Syrup zine


Richard Moult: Piano, Keyboards
David Colohan: Acoustic & Electric Guitars, Keyboards, Alto Saxophone & Trombone

Composed by Richard Moult & David Colohan. Piano recorded between the hours of 3am - 4am, on the Isle Of Skye, January 2013, during gale force winds. David Colohan's instrumentation recorded at The Hibernaculum, Ballymahon, Ireland, Spring - Autumn 2013.

Mixed by Richard Moult at Black Rabbit Lodge, Autumn 2013. Mastered by Wil Bolton.

Thank you: Amanda, Adele, Wil and Colin.

Et conversus sum ut viderem vocem, quæ loquebatur mecum ...
Revelation 1:12

credits

released November 12, 2013

Hexameron III - vimeo.com/81323438

Hexameron V - vimeo.com/82019947

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David Colohan Ireland

'An eerie loveliness that should really be soundtracking a Werner Herzog film; indeed Popol Vuh’s work provides a useful reference point for Raising Holy Sparks as, similar to Vuh, the music herein is almost religious in its solemnity and grace.' The Active Listener ... more

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